The Jaded New Yorker and Customer Service

Have you ever walked into a store and not been greeted by an employee? I was born and raised in NYC. Walking into a store and not being greeted by an employee or not being able to find an employee to help you locate an item was the norm to me.

The lack of customer service became so routine to me that when I moved to Charlotte, I was annoyed every time I entered a store. So annoyed I would send my husband shopping so that I would not have to interact with store employees. In addition to the abundant ‘welcome’s’ and ‘may I help you with anything’ the part I wished to avoid the most it checking out. While at the check-out no matter what lane or store it was the same thing, ‘how are you today, ma’am?’ followed by an extensive conversation about nothingness ranging from commentary about the weather to questions regarding the items I purchased or stories about their family members.

I had to evaluate where did the problem lie. Were the store employees that annoying. While a small percentage of that may be true but it could not be the case when for every store; I had to look within and discover something very surprising. It took a long time for me to realize how jaded New York City has made me. I was conditioned by the rudeness and self-centered attitude customs of a New Yorker. I needed to break this negative influence very quickly, especially if I was going to be a long-time resident of Charlotte.

I began to look at customer service from a new perspective. In conjunction with the need to change my outlook, I also needed this change if I were to become an entrepreneur who will need to provide nothing less that superior customer service. I needed to evaluate the experience of customer service from the perspective of both the provider and the recipient. What I was accustomed to, was in reality, not acceptable.

I took the time to evaluate customer service from the perspective of the customer as well as the employee. Recently, I recorded my customer service experiences over the course of this past summer. My decision to do such was two-fold; one, to strip myself of all negative notions of ‘annoying customer service’ and two, to establish the type of customer service I want to develop and implement within my business.

If I am walking into an establishment of which I plan to become a patron, I expect to be acknowledged and respected. I would like to feel comfortable and confident that my money is being spent in an establishment that recognizes my contribution. Greeting me upon entry is not annoy it assists in removing any apprehensions I, as the customer, may have; especially if I plan on making a significant purchase. Also, statistics have shown that consumers tend to spend more money when they feel relaxed and comfortable.

Having an employee ask a customer if assistance is needed before they have to seek help reinforces customer acknowledgement which increases the level of comfort and relaxation. Having an employee within reach at all times is beneficial to the customer because it decreases moments of anxiety or frustration when a question or concern cannot be immediately addressed. The average person level of interest is a very short span, and once a person has to seek assistance, interest is evaluated and most often lost.

It is easy to underestimate the value and significance customer service can bring. Excellent customer service can increase sales for business while subpar customer service can run a business into closing its doors permanently. It is up to the business owner to find a working balance between providing first-rate customer service without compromising the integrity of the establishment as well as the employees.

As an entrepreneur, making sure the customer is always satisfied is a tough task and contrary to popular belief the customer cannot always ‘be right.’ Is it fair or even moral for a business owner to ignore the significance of its employees to provide gratification to a customer, especially if the gratification requesting is undeserving? I like to adhere to the ideology that the customer is not always right, but they are deserving of making sure they receive the right level of customer service.

My observations have led me to establish a new outlook on customer service. I am no longer annoyed when I am greeted or asked if I need assistance. I do find myself offended when I encounter establishments that do not provide welcoming and helpful customer service.

8 Critical Steps to Establish a Customer Service Culture

“Every company’s greatest assets are its customers,
because without customers there is no company,”
–Erwin Frand

During our recent weakened economy, many businesses have seen declining revenues and declining budgets. Declining budgets often lead to reduced staff levels and diminished services. To me, this does not make sense. I believe that it is during the down times, when service should be at the forefront and retention of loyal customers even more of a focus.

When price wars fail to drive revenues, businesses often look to service to give them a competitive advantage. Many big business marketers are returning to a “service sells” mentality, however, many sell great customer service and few deliver. The problem is that few marketers have ever truly served a customer.

Throughout my years in business, I have had the opportunity to interact and develop a customer service philosophy. It is inherent that when you are in a service-based business, there will be times when your customer is compelled to offer you their feedback. It is what you do with this feedback that will shape the future and their impression of your business.

Upon reflection, most all of my interactions with displeased customers were not the result of a poor product, but rather a disappointing customer experience. Why is that? Because, product is not personal, customer service is. Briefly, I would like to share with you eight critical steps to establish a customer service culture.

1. Customers are the reason for work, not an interruption of work

This sounds really obvious doesn’t it? How many times have you gone into a business only to wait while someone is on the telephone or busy doing some “non-service” task? Employees often lose sight of the importance of the customer and get consumed in lesser day to day tasks. Sure, there are tasks that need to be accomplished, but you cannot afford to sacrifice service to get them done. Good customer service must be a priority for you and your team. Without your customers, you have no company!

2. Train, train, and continue to train.

o Cross train your entire staff to be able to assist a customer regardless of their department. When a customer becomes upset they want their problem solved not to be shuffled between employees that are not empowered or enable to assist them.

o Offer continuous customer service training for your staff and once they are providing good service, continue to train them.

o Utilize role play situations to assist your staff in recognizing and experiencing both easy and difficult service opportunities. If an employee has a level of comfort with a difficult situation, they will be able to better handle it.

3. Empower your staff to serve

o Establish a system of resources for your staff to serve the customer. Allow them latitude to take the necessary action to provide exceptional service and resolve any issues should a customer become disgruntled. Create a structured system to allow your staff to serve customers.

o Establish a discretionary budget that an employee may access to recover a customer before you lose them. I recently learned that a major hotel chain has a monetary fund available per year and per employee enabling them to go above and beyond to ensure exceptional service. This empowers the employee to right a wrong or create a “memorable” customer experience. I am not advocating large sums of money, but with regards to customer service, a small gesture can go a long way.

o Ask your staff what tools would enable them to provide better service. You would not send a fireman into a burning building without the proper equipment. Failing to empower and enable your staff with the necessary tools to serve you customer leaves you with few options other than poor service.

4. Make service personal

o Greet repeat customers by name, if possible.

o Offer a handshake and introduce yourself. Creating service that is personal will not only retain customers, but help diffuse difficult situations should they arise.

o Thank your customers for their patronage. It really does make a difference.

5. It is OK to say “Yes”, even when you should say “No”

o Support your staff when they make customer service decisions. In my business, it is my policy that an employee can act without concern for repercussion, as long as they are meeting a customer’s need. I have found this creates a greater willingness to serve the customer.

o Often times you could say “no” to a customer, however, “no” can have huge implications on your business. Ask yourself, “Am I willing to potentially lose 10 customers as result of this interaction?”

6. Offer a solution

o Shift from the problem to the process for resolution.

o Offer a choice between several options.

o Put yourself in their place.

o Involve the customer in determining the solution.

o Clearly explain any limitations that exist.

7. Recognize your staff members for outstanding service

o Implement a customer service awards program that recognizes employees for exceptional customer service. Maybe you have tried these without success and do not believe that they work. I would tend to agree if the program were like most I have seen. Try something different; break the mold. One of my most successful clients offers spa treatments for his female employees if a customer goes out of their way to recognize them for great service. Another client provides his employees with a “day off with pay” incentive for every five unsolicited, positive customer comments that he receives. These are just a few examples that are “outside the box.” Be creative and generate a little excitement in your staff for customer service.

o Take the time to acknowledge employees at staff meetings. People want to leave their mark and feel that they matter. Taking the time to recognize them in front of their peers can make a real difference.

8. Ask your customers what they think of your service

The best way to find out if you are satisfying customers is to ask them. Formal efforts could include customer surveys, questionnaires, interviews or comment/suggestion cards. Informally, get out and talk with your customers and your staff. Ask them how they feel about service you are providing. Ideally, use a combination of both methods.

You may be thinking, “Why should I go ask for trouble? Who knows what I might hear if I ask?” That is the point. As you will see in the statistics below, most customers will not voice their disappointment with your service levels. They will simply leave and never return. If you do not ask about the quality of your service, you might make the wrong assumptions and feel that you can reduce service levels because you get few complaints and lead your organization into areas that turn off your customers or cause problems that you never intended.

On the other hand, asking your customers about their satisfaction sends a message to them that you care about your business and about them. While you might hear some criticisms, you might also learn what you are doing right and see what you should modify.

In addition to the information, you will benefit from the interaction. Every interaction is a customer service opportunity. Make the most of each and every one.

Most of us continue doing business with people and businesses who give good service. We might not say anything, but we reward good service providers by continuing to do business with them. If the service is outstanding, we will probably tell our friends and colleagues about it. Likewise, when we receive poor service most of us vote, not with our voice, but with our feet–we just leave.

In the 1980′s the White House Office of Consumer Affairs commissioned a report called the TARP study. The report revealed the following facts about unhappy customers:

96% of dissatisfied customers do not complain directly.

90% will not return.

One unhappy customer will tell nine others.

13% will tell at least 20 other people

Superior customer service is one of the most difficult deliverables facing the business world today. Selling service is the easy part, delivering on that promise offers a tremendous challenge. So I ask you, what can you do to improve the service you provide? Implement these eight steps and begin to excel at providing a superior customer culture today!

How to provide Superior Customer Service

As many of you know, I have made it my mission to change the world’s view point of customer service. Too many people today have just accepted the fact that no matter where they go, they will receive less than acceptable customer service. THAT’S NOT ACCEPTABLE!

When we work so hard for the money we have, why spend it at a business establishment (no matter what type of business) that provides you less than superior customer service? Does it really make sense to hand your money over that way? Still not clear… okay, let me present this to you in another way. You go to a restaurant and ask for a steak. The waitress brings you out a piece of chicken. You shrug your shoulders and say, “okay, that’s fine.” Furthermore, you eat the chicken and still leave the waitress a tip…would you really accept that? No, of course not! But that is the type of unacceptable customer service we are receiving in other places of business and just nodding our heads, and saying okay! STOP THE MADNESS PEOPLE!

For all you customers out there (which means everyone), it is time to reclaim your God given right to receive Great Customer Service. It’s called Free Will people, and I’m going to use my free will to change the world’s view on customer service. One of the ways I plan on doing this is by refusing to do business anywhere that I receive poor customer service. Are you willing to help me in this mission? All you have to do is this: stop doing business in places that don’t appreciate your business. And, let them know that you are no longer going to do business there and why. Sometimes business owners or managers do not know there is a problem until you let them know, so make sure you tell them. Once we start changing our views on what we accept as customer service, the businesses will adapt to start pleasing us better. It makes sense, doesn’t it!

As for all of you employees and employers out there, there are certain steps you can take to make sure your customers receive the best customer service around. And, when you start providing that type of customer service, your customers will keep coming back for more. In fact, if you provide them with the best service they can get anywhere and with a little flair, they will come back more often because they can’t get enough of it.

So, what are the steps? Follow these certain steps to assure your customers will be coming back for more: (I have broken this down into two stages. One for employers and one for employees please read both!)

Employers

Provide training to your employees on how to treat your customers. If you are unsure of how this should be done, please visit my blog at what-customer-service.blogspot.com and email me and I will set up a training class for you. Think of it this way… what do your customers’ expect to get from your business. This is obviously different for every business and also depends on the type of business you have. But put yourself in your customer’s shoes…If you were the customer, what would you expect to see in terms of customer service? Once you have clearly defined that, you can then train the employees on how to provide it.
Set the standards high for your employees and make sure they stick to it. However, don’t just use this as a tool to “write up” or “fire” your employees. Let me be clear… if you have an employee who you need to fire then by all means do so. But I don’t believe in the type of management that only uses negative reinforcement. I believe that you should also use positive reinforcement with your employees as well. In fact, you’ll find that the more positive reinforcement you use, the more you’ll get out of your employees. Don’t use fear management. It breeds negativity and bad morale and eventually your customers can feel and sense it. This will only further lead to poor customer service.
Having Mystery shops of your business is a great way to find out how your employees are doing. Now, having said this again I go back to my last point, do not use this as a fear management tactic. I have worked for a business that did this and believe me it only breeds negativity and poor morale and again only leads to poor customer service because the customers sense the tension with your employee. Now, if you do not know what mystery shopping is, let me clear it up for you. Mystery shopping is where you have someone pose as a customer or potential customer to see what kind of customer experience they receive when they come to your business. Again, the standards that are in place all depend on your type of business and what you have trained your employees to provide to the customer. Obviously if you haven’t trained them yet, do not do this until you have. Now, mystery shopping can be done in several ways. You can hire a company to do this for you. You provide the company with the criteria that your employees should meet and what you want the mystery customer to do and say. Then, they will hire a mystery shopper to come in posing as the customer and the mystery shopper will report back to the company you hired on how your employee did with full details on each of the criteria and an overall grade. The company then gives you the details on the mystery shop. It is a great way to test your customer’s overall experience and further train your employees. Now, a few things I recommend. Do not tell your employees that you are doing this. If they know, they will be nervous and treat your customers differently. It is more natural if you just have them doing what they always do to grade the normal customer experience. Once you have received the feed back, use it as a training tool for not just that employee but all of them so everyone is on the same level. And reward the employee for a job well done. If you don’t want to hire a company to do the mystery shopping, you can ask a friend or family member to pose as the customer and grade the experience. Or, survey your customers on how well they thought their overall experience was, what they liked about it, what they didn’t like about it, and what they thought you could do differently!
Lastly, and I can’t stress this enough, the only way to provide great customer service is to have a customer service standard, have a plan on how your employees will deliver your standards, and test the standards. Also, pay your employees what they deserve and provide them rewards for going the extra mile. If your employees are making minimum wage and not getting any incentive to “go the extra mile”, then you won’t get anything extra from them and neither will your customers. Your employees are the face of your business. The service your business receives comes directly from your employees, so make sure your employees are getting a fair deal.

Employees

First of all, when you are working with customers, no matter what your occupation, think of it this way…How would you want to be treated if you were that client?
If you are unhappy about your current job, don’t take it out on the customer. Remember, it is not their fault that you are unhappy with your job and it’s not their fault that you’re in the situation you are in, whatever it may be. Again, remember, what would you expect if you were the customer?
When talking with a client, first of all, smile! Say Hello, how can I help you? If you are not behind a counter of some kind, shake their hand, introduce yourself and ask their name. Then, ask them how you can be of assistance.
If your employer has a standard for customer service, make sure you know what it is and abide by it. And, at the end of the year, when you get your annual review, make sure you remind your boss in writing how you met that standard and ask that it be added to your annual review.
If you work in a store of some kind, like a grocery store, department store, etc…why do you ignore customers as they walk by you? Why do you try to run them over as you are wandering around the store? When you go into a store do you expect to be run over, run down, or ignored? And when you are, does it bother you? Here’s my point – it should not matter where you work, you should never ignore a customer walking past and you are never more important than a customer. This is a valuable lesson to learn. No matter who you are or where you work, you have to learn to appreciate your customers! Think of it this way – not only that you could be that customer getting the poor service but more importantly, if it wasn’t for that customer, you wouldn’t have a job! Remember that the next time you ignore a customer.

The fact of the matter is that customer service is ignored or takes second place to growing a business and increasing profitability. When in fact, great customer service will do just that, grow your business and make it more profitable.

If you survey a room of 50 people, 94% of the people in the room would tell you that they have not received good customer service lately. Furthermore, they would tell you that they have received extremely poor service recently, more than they wish to recall.

I believe that together, we can change the way we are treated as customers and the way we treat customers. If we all work together to change the view point of everyone, then maybe we can bring back the days in which customers were respected and could recall more examples of “Great Customer Service” rather than poor customer service.

Please feel free to email me. In order to email me, you must visit my blog at what-customer-service.blogspot.com and then find my email link. I’d love to hear your thoughts and comments not only about this article but examples of customer service you have received lately. Thank you in advance for assisting me in my mission.

8 Strategies to Improve Customer Service

Every brand believes that its customer service is excellent. In reality, however, customer service across brands is mediocre. The experience is generally inconvenient, unpleasant, unsatisfactory, sometimes humiliating, and definitely expensive.

Good customer service is an integral part of business. It affects important brand and business objectives like customer satisfaction, loyalty, retention, repeat purchase, up selling and usage revenue. In light of these business implications, there is continuous pressure on brands to improve customers’ perceptions of their service.

Improving customer service should not be that difficult. It can happen if organizations reconsider certain business strategies. In my opinion, the following eight strategies are very important to improve customer service:

1) Incorporate in business planning: The quantum and nature of service requirements are dependent on the activities of many other functions. Organizations should incorporate customers’ service requirements into all aspects of business activities like product design, procurement, production, handling, pricing, communication, people, and culture. This would help organizations to prepare better for service eventualities and at the same time make customer service the responsibility of the entire organization.

2) Change attitude to service: Despite being a critical business activity, customer service function does not command the same respect that many other functions do. Many perceive it to be dirty, menial, and unpleasant. Service center appearances and resources are always far inferior, especially to that sales and marketing. If an organization treats the service function in this manner, customers are likely to get the same treatment from the service function.

Organization’s attitude to service is a reflection of its attitude to customers. Management has to go far beyond providing mere lip service if the rest of the organization has to respect customer service and customers.

3) Integrate with marketing: Customers are an important marketing resource. They are the most credible brand ambassadors, their word of mouth recommendation is far more effective than all other marketing activities put together. Given its importance to marketing, organizations should make marketing solely responsible for customer care and if necessary create a separate customer marketing function to protect, nurture, and leverage its core assets (customers) far more productively. Integrating it with core marketing will also remove the stigma associated with service.

4) Shed the profit center approach: Many organizations try to make a profit through customer service. In a profit center approach, revenue-generating activities like sales of maintenance contracts, spares, and expensive call charges become more important than the aforementioned business objectives. Selling at low margins is normally the reason for the profit center approach. Attempting to increase profit through service would anyway not work as customers expect service charges also to be low if the product purchase price was low. Expensive service charges would also force customers to choose cheaper third party service providers.

Brand and business objectives should be the only purpose of the customer service function. The collective value of these business measures, in near term and long term, would always be higher than the profits made from normal service activities. A profit center or cost center approach, disregarding business objectives, would be detrimental to the brand.

5) Adopt retention pricing: Product pricing should include the cost of acquisition and the cost of retention including the service cost. Discounting the service and retention cost to make the sale price attractive would only force the brand to recover the lost margin through subsequent transactions.

It is wrong to believe that customers do not deserve good service just because the sale price was low. Every customer, irrespective of the price that he pays, expects good service. The product price should therefore, have a sufficient margin to meet those expectations.

6) Manage expectations: Customers have explicit and implicit service expectations. Explicit expectations are formed basis the claims and promises made by the brand at the time of purchase. The brand has complete control over explicit expectations. Implicit expectations formed basis the customers’ perception of brand image, stature, reputation and the price premium they pay for a brand are far more difficult to gauge and manage.

Most often organizations measure only the explicit commitments. Failure to identify and measure implicit expectations is a big reason for the gap between its understanding of the quality of service rendered and customers’ perception of the service received. Customers’ perception of service will improve only when both these expectations met.

7) Recognize the role reversal: Brands make an emotional pitch to sell but provide service by the rulebook. Customers though, buy rationally but react emotionally to product and service failures. Recognizing this role reversal will help brands to appreciate the customer’s pain better and adopt an appropriate service response. Brands should remember that they are not dealing with failed products but with people’s emotions caused by failed products. An emotional approach to service, similar to the sales pitch, might work better than a rational response.

8) Focus on customers’ convenience; not yours: Most service facilities and procedures are not customer friendly. Service centers are far and few, the locations are remote, phone lines are always busy, the service center timings always conflict with customers’ work hours, and the waiting time at the service center is invariably long. Further, asking such aggrieved customers to fill lengthy forms, answer questions (often interrogatory and structured to make the customer feel that he or she is responsible for the problem), wait inordinately, listen to policies and rules is inconsiderate and humiliating.

These inconveniences dissuade customers from choosing company service. Removing such irritants, besides improving customer experience, would also encourage more customers to choose company service over third party service. Increase in service revenue because of more customers choosing company service should compensate for the increase in cost, if any, of providing service at customers’ convenience.

6 Steps to Deliver Remarkable Customer Service

From a viral video to a positive review, a customer’s motivation to share their experience with your product or service usually comes down to remarkability. By remarkable we mean something that is worth commenting on and sharing with others.

Sharing can be in the form of ratings, reviews, comments, posts, and good old fashioned word-of-mouth. For small businesses, what your company offers must be remarkable, and the largest opportunity to make a guest’s experience notable lies within the domain of customer interaction. From the smallest details to the overall company culture, the customer’s experience is what makes or breaks continued client attraction and retention.

How do you instill a culture in your small business that motivates your staff to deliver consistently remarkable customer service, resulting in increased customer loyalty and revenues?

Here are six steps to delivering consistently on your customer promise and improving your business.

It Starts and Ends at the Top

Customer service begins and ends with YOU, the owner. Nothing else really matters, and all other efforts are pointless, unless the owners truly believe in the value of delivering remarkable customer service.

Do you believe your customers are looking to take advantage of you, or do you realize that the vast majority of them are honest and will reward you with their loyalty if you treat them right? Are your employee policies all about control and avoiding theft, or is your staff truly empowered to take care of the customer? The “Employee of the Month” plaque on the wall is meaningless if the owners and management of the company don’t truly believe in delivering remarkable customer service, and the investment it requires.

The investment from the top includes believing in and instilling a persistent culture of superior service. It should include a shared manifesto which serves as a foundation for your company’s culture. It’s not just the clichĂ© posters about leadership and team work, but your true conviction about running your company in a way that proudly represents you and your staff. It’s about delivering the service you enjoy experiencing when you visit your favorite establishments – the places you go back to again and again because they make you feel great, and which you share with others!

Culture

The interaction between customer and company has become increasingly transparent, thanks in part to technology. Company brands are no longer static entities, but rather dynamic and personified. Culture is everything in today’s business environment, and customers can smell insincerity from a mile away. Part of a brand’s culture must be built from the values and core beliefs of the company’s owners. Your company should foster an environment where a passion for remarkable customer service can thrive. Like much in life, it all comes down to balance. If you believe in your core values and have faith in the ability and training of your employees to deliver, it will be easier to develop an environment of empowerment and trust.

Culture is a living, breathing organism that needs to be supported and nurtured. It evolves over time, but the core tenets should never waiver. One way to measure if you have successfully instilled a strong culture is to observe how your team handles a new member. Does the team automatically correct and guide the new member’s behavior and actions if they vary from the accepted norms of your culture without being told? Are they quick to tell managers that this new employee is not a fit? Does the new employee stand out from the other employees and feel as if they are a “fish out of water”? These are good signs that your team embodies the culture of your business and leads to consistently delivering on your customer promise, even when you are not watching.

Systems

Systems are the ways in which a company’s culture is carried out consistently and repeatedly. Without the infrastructure of systems (including software, manuals, forms, training, and checklists), remarkable customer service deteriorates quickly. Systems are the key to executing consistently in every aspect of your business.

As it relates to customer service, your employee training and development systems are critical. Well trained employees that have access to protocols and procedures which foster good client relationships are a key to the success of any business. Your focus should be to develop systems as if you are a multi-unit operation, even if you are running a single-location company. This approach supports the repeatability of your process which should ensure that every new employee is hired, trained and developed to the same productive and effective standard.

Employees

Your culture and systems mean nothing without the right team of highly motivated people to execute them. When it comes to your company’s team of workers, it’s important to take the time and focus on finding people that will make a good fit.

Always remember to hire slowly, and fire quickly. If a member of the staff is not a good fit, it is critical to sever ties quickly. Remember, just because an employee is unsuited for a particular position does not make them a bad person or poor worker, it’s just likely not a good fit.

When hiring customer-facing employees, personality and character are often more important than skills or experience. You can teach a person new skills, but it’s extremely difficult to teach someone how to enjoy working with and serving customers. It’s helpful to have a baseline of a great employee, and also use employee assessment tools like Kolbe’s RightFit™ solutions when possible to help you choose the right candidate for the position.

Listen and Measure

How do you know if you are delivering consistently remarkable customer experiences? How do you measure customer service and satisfaction? It’s imperative that you and your management team listen and measure to objectively assess your progress and execution. Your customers will tell you what they think about your product and service, but you have to listen and be receptive to their feedback. You must also measure, and reward or correct, how your staff is executing. Doing so keeps your focus on customer service top-of-mind throughout your entire organization.

From online reviews to mystery shoppers, the trick is to make sure to listen and take into account what your customers are saying. Try listening for broad themes that permeate from a variety of sources. Ask your employees what they think, or ask a friend to test out your business as a customer to get an unadulterated and trustworthy view of customer-facing interaction. Monitor social media platforms and use alert technologies to stay attuned to what people are saying about your business. Take reviews and feedback to heart, and take input from the loyal customers who love your company.

Execute Consistently

Consistency is the true test of your commitment to delivering remarkable customer experiences. Are you dedicated to delivering remarkable service for the life of your business, or was it just a fading phase?

An individual customer does not really care that you have executed flawlessly on the previous thousand customers – it’s their transaction and interaction that matters most. Furthermore, a high opinion from one customer can be cancelled out by a bad opinion from another. And people are more likely to share a poor experience than a positive one – a reality which is greatly amplified by the relative anonymity and ease of the internet to share with others and encourage everyone to become a critic.

Delivering consistently, with each customer and every interaction, is the most difficult thing to achieve, and it should be your ultimate goal. While it’s impossible to be perfect, your standard must be set extremely high so that you execute as closely to 100% as possible. And when you fail, as we all naturally do at times, your process should include a fast and genuine resolution for your customers. Most customers understand that we all make mistakes – what they don’t usually tolerate is indifference and lack of follow-up.

Being remarkable is often what sets us apart from the competition. Our products and services must be of high quality, but it’s the experiences our customers enjoy when they interact with us that they value and share the most.

How To Make Money Using an Udemy Online Teaching Course

A few decades ago, it was hard to find a good teacher. The only option that you had was to look for one in your area because the Internet was not available at that time. Nowadays, the internet has made it a lot easier to learn from the comfort of home. If you have been thinking of taking a certain course to hone your skills, we suggest that you check out Udemy. Let’s find out how people make money on Udemy by launching courses through websites. Read on to know more.

What Is Udemy?

Basically, this platform brings both students and teachers together. As a matter of fact, Udemy is one of the top platforms for online courses. It offers a lot of free tools and support for instructors to develop courses and make money from them.

Udemy allows anyone to create a course and offer it to everyone across the globe through its platform. Nowadays, the platform has more than 15 million students from more than 190 countries. Moreover, it has courses in more than 80 languages.

Launching a Course

If you want to submit a course on Udemy, you may want to follow the steps below. We will talk about each step in detail so you can get started without any problem.

Sign up

First of all, you may want to go to the home page of Udemy and sign up for an account, which will cost you nothing. As soon as you have signed up, you can access tons of free as well as paid courses.

Course creation

After signing up, you can hit the “Teaching” button. The “Create a course” button will show up that you can press to create a course and become a tutor.

Udemy revenue model

For course creation, Udemy won’t charge you any fee. On the other hand, for selling, you do have to consider the revenue model offered by the platform. Let’s find out more about the revenue model.

Instructor promotion

After a lead generation, the entire revenue goes to the course instructor. For instance, if a lead is generated through the coupon code given by the course creator, the instructor will get the revenue.

Organic traffic

If the course buyer comes to the platform through organic traffic, 50% of the revenue will go to the course creator. And the rest will go to the website. So, there is a lot of money to be made even if you don’t use other means to get the word about your courses.

Other revenue sharing model

This revenue sharing ratio can be between 25% and 97%. Actually, the ratio is based on the fact whether the customer comes to the platform via deals, ads or affiliates. So, based on these factors, the revenue can be more or less.

Resources for Udemy

Udemy helps you throughout the process. Whether you are going to create a course or you want to promote, the platform has resources for you. Udemy offers tons of free resources that help you make your course a success. As a matter of fact, the free resources on this platform are on the list of the best advantages of Udemy, as they help you make money from your course without too much struggle.

So, if you have been thinking of creating a course and publishing it on Udemy, we suggest that you take into account the advice given in this article. Just make sure your course is interesting and it can help your students learn new things. And that’s all you need in order to sell your courses and make a lot of money.

Ideal Solutions To Success Online

If you have ever spent time looking for ideal solutions to success online, you could find yourself very frustrated. You found that there are basic ways to succeed in this line of work. You know that online work isn’t hard, physical labor. Working online is easy in that there isn’t a lot of physical work involved. People who work hard as builders, factory workers, office personnel and in administration, must work hard and produce good results or they no longer have a job. Online work isn’t hard physically. However, it takes tenacity, perseverance, and a little knowledge to be successful. Perhaps herein lies part of your annoyance. Let’s look at some things that bring frustration into your ideal online performance. The items are not listed in any particular order of difficulty or ordered frustration levels.

Number 1, Building a Website

The number one thing that frustrates many people and keeps them from being successful online is building a website. This one thing kept me from being successful online years ago. When you find the right training building a website can be really easy. You don’t have to know HTML to build one today. You can learn how to make a website at certain locations on the Internet. There are places where you can learn how to make a free website.

Number 2, Finding a Domain Name

The best way to relieve frustration from finding a domain name is to first find the niche you want to promote. The name of your site needs to match the niche you have chosen. So, the way you keep this from being frustrating is to identify your niche, and then write a list of 10 to 15 names that describe your niche. It’s like choosing a title for a book, the title must tell what the book is about. Same with your domain name. It must tell what your niche is about. I prefer to stick with a .com. It’s just a personal preference that you don’t have to adhere to.

Number 3, Getting Site Ready

Until you learn, getting your site ready for search engine optimization can be really frustrating. Actually, it can be next to impossible if you don’t have the proper training. Again, I have a page for you to review that explains the ins and outs of preparing your site for SEO. Again, you can write articles, use social media such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. The big question you need to ask is, “Where are you going to get the training and knowledge on how to make these ideas work for you?”

Number 4, Getting Traffic

The number one goal for any marketing site is to drive traffic to it. There are many ways to do this, but the only way I choose to do this is by writing good content for my website. What if you can’t write, or at least you think you can’t? Many sites offer training on how to write.The training on a few sites is phenomenal. Every bit of the training is to help you build a site, monetize it and then drive traffic to it. You can learn so many ideas on what to write that you will never run out of something to write about. Getting traffic is almost done for you. All you have to do is follow directions.

Number 5, Training

Before I found a helpful site, training was my nemesis. The lack of training defeated me every time and cost me money. The training I have gotten has given me a handle on success. I have learned how to succeed because I have been trained well. Following are a few things I have been able to find online:

Certification Courses: 5 Levels

1. Getting Started

2. Build Your own Traffic Producing Website

3. Making Money!

4. Mastering Social Engagement

5. Achieving Maximum Success Through Content Creation

Each level has several courses and the training available to make you successful! I repeated most of the lessons. Some were simple but needed more exploring. Others were new to me and my then limited expertise. I can’t believe how much knowledge is packed into these lessons. Yet the progress from one step to the next is given in easy steps for those who aren’t technologically proficient when they begin the courses.

You Get All the Training

Every site that I tried before this would promise they could teach me how to be successful. What they taught me was that I needed to hire a group of professional online gurus to help me build a successful online business. I paid good money to learn this, too. Their ads said that even a monkey could learn how to use their program. I guess that I’m not as smart as a monkey because I couldn’t begin to understand what they were trying to teach me. “You’ll never believe how easy it is to make money online,” their ads read. I learned the hard way, out of pocketbook hard way, that paper will lie still and let you write anything on it. At least the paper they wrote on did! I was never able to follow more than the first couple steps. Not nearly enough to learn anything. However, all that has changed now. Since I found this site, I have learned how to be successful online. All I’ve done since I’ve been here is grow and grow. That’s where I am. That was what I was looking for in the first place. Can I tell you that I found a place where you can work at your pace, make the amount of money you want to make, and work when and where you want to.

Work for Yourself

The best boss you will ever have is YOU. Working for yourself online doesn’t require lots of energy. You don’t have to have a specific location where you go to work. With today’s technological advances, you can work from nearly anywhere. I prefer to work at home with my family nearby. That’s where you can find yourself, too. Are you ready for the change? Are you ready to be your own boss? Then don’t wait! Visit me to begin today!